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Experience in Action Games and the Effects on Executive Control

Experience in Action Games and the Effects on Executive Control

Many people spend numerous hours a day playing video games. Furthermore, the video game industry is expanding as the number of its clients constantly increases. Surveys show that 58 % of Americans play video games and 25 million Germans play games several times a month. This frequent use of video games occurs independently of gender, education, and income (e.g., BIU, 2012). Many politicians and members of the public media express their concerns about this development and... / more

Why do we so often ignore the influence of situations on behavior?

Why do we so often ignore the influence of situations on behavior?

Situations matter; they have an effect on us all, great or small. We are told we should walk a mile in someone elses shoes, to look at it from my point of view, and would never dream of swearing in the principals office. So why are we so quick to judge others’ behavior as if the situations they find themselves in are irrelevant? Imagine you are walking... / more

Why do we still have a cognitive bias that makes us send innocent people to jail? – Explanations of the confirmation bias

Why do we still have a cognitive bias that makes us send innocent people to jail? – Explanations of the confirmation bias

The confirmation bias – seeking and interpreting information to support your pre-existing beliefs – can have tremendous consequences. In this blog, I will explain the existence of the confirmation bias in the criminal justice system and give two possible explanations to why we still have this bias. / more

Does it matter if people are aware of their implicit racial bias?

Does it matter if people are aware of their implicit racial bias?

In this blog post, I discuss how people respond to information about their implicit racial bias—automatic attitudes and beliefs that favor one ethnic group over another. Although people can be defensive, emerging research suggests there are benefits to accepting implicit racial bias and being aware of this subtle prejudice. / more

Yielding to temptation: How and why some people are better at controlling themselves

Yielding to temptation: How and why some people are better at controlling themselves

Have you ever found yourself eating a tempting chocolate cake, although you want to lose a few pounds? Have you ever found yourself watching television, although you planned to work on an important but maybe boring project that day? Did you ever procrastinate with submitting your tax declaration, preferring to go to a hockey game that night? Or did you ever catch yourself flirting with another person, although you feel...
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Complex Dilemmas in Group Therapy: Pathways to Resolution

Complex Dilemmas in Group Therapy: Pathways to Resolution

A therapist working within the framework of psychodynamic psychotherapy has to concentrate not only on the patient’s story, but also needs to be aware of the ongoing transference and countertransference dynamic, projective identifications and other defense mechanisms. It makes the therapy process quite challenging for the psychotherapist. All these challenges multiply in a group setting, where the therapist has to be aware of the interactions between the clients and him or herself, but also between the clients. Not all... / more

How the Body Knows its Mind: The Surprising Power of the Physical Environment to Influence How You Think and Feel

How the Body Knows its Mind: The Surprising Power of the Physical Environment to Influence How You Think and Feel

Can Botox be used to treat depression? Can adopting a “power pose” make you feel more confident? Does carrying a grocery basket versus pushing a cart alter purchasing behavior? In How the Body Knows its Mind: The Surprising Power of the Physical Environment to Influence How You Think and Feel, Dr. Sian Beilock (also the author of Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal About Getting It Right When... / more

The cross-cultural psychology of Internet privacy concern

The cross-cultural psychology of Internet privacy concern

In a recent cross-cultural study of Facebook users in Japan and the US, I show that Japanese SNS users are more concerned about Internet privacy than American SNS users. And it turns out that because Americans have higher general trust, they less likely to believe that a stranger would take advantage of their private information, should it be leaked online. / more

From the Editors: Commentary for Mobility Special Issue

From the Editors: Commentary for Mobility Special Issue

Schug and Lu (this issue) present an overview of research on the similarity-attraction link, noting cultural differences in this phenomenon (e.g., in America & Japan).  They note that variables such as relational mobility and size of social network matter. They also note the dark side of having preferences for similarity in relationships, which can lead to segregation based on factors like race or education level. Another line of research...

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How to win (and lose) friendships across cultures: Why relational mobility matters

How to win (and lose) friendships across cultures: Why relational mobility matters

Making and keeping friends: Strategy matters

Friendships can be tough work. Whether it’s making them or maintaining them, friendships usually require effort. If you’re from a Western country, this likely involves trusting and relying on others, and confidently communicating your strengths and your struggles. Let’s call these your strategies for relational success: Let people know what sort of friend you are, and you’ll increase your chances of finding and keeping a desirable friend. For a moment,... / more

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